Oops! It appears that you have disabled your Javascript. In order for you to see this page as it is meant to appear, we ask that you please re-enable your Javascript!

Peak Design Does It Again!

This week I wanted to write about a new camera carry system from the good folks at PeakDesign. I have been buying PeakDesign’s items for a couple years now, they came out with a nice camera carry system called the Capture Pro Clip. This unique system allow photographers to attach their cameras to their own belt or backpack straps and have a quick disconnect via a tripod style plate so you could remove the camera, shoot and snap it back into place when done! This first image is the Capture Pro Clip. I bought two of the Capture Pro Clips …

Focus Stacking

This week I wanted to write about a photography technique that I recently started playing with that I learned during my recent View Camera Theory class. Every seen a photo in a magazine ad for a new watch or other small item and wondered “How do they get the entire item in such sharp focus?” They use a technique called Focus Stacking so that every part of that Rolex is in razor sharp focus, from the numbers and hands on the watch to the band attached to it. Focus Stacking is where you set your camera up on a tripod …

Get More Out of Your Wide-Angle Lens

Many photographers feel that portrait lenses are only 50mm, 85mm and 135mm, which is also why the 70-200mm F/2.8 is the best selling lens in the world whether they are made by Canon, Nikon, Sigma or Tamron. I know you will think I am crazy but you can actually get more use out of your wide-angle lens than just shooting landscapes. One of the really creative uses for your wide-angle lens is Wide-Angle Portraits! I captured this first image with my Canon EF 17-40mm F/4 L USM at Vines Botanical Gardens in Loganville, Ga. Now before you start flaming me …

Light Field Photography

This week I wanted to write about a new style of photography that I have recently started playing with, called Light Field photography. A light field camera, also known as a plenoptic camera, captures information about the light field emanating from a scene; that is, the intensity of light in a scene, and also the direction that the light rays are traveling in space. This contrasts with a conventional camera, which records only light intensity. In this first image, the focus is on the little plaque on the table. The first light field camera was proposed by Gabriel Lippman in …